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Cotton UV Sun Protection 2 in 1 Removable Visor Hat

Cotton UV Sun Protection 2 in 1 Removable Visor Hat

Regular price $ 14.99 Sale

Simple, unique, 2 in 1 removable visorhats.
Perfect for various outdoor activities suchas hiking, gardening, and biking.
Offers protection from harmful UV rays andshields eyes from the bright sun.
Must-have accessory for yourself, yourfriends, and family!

Material: 65%Cotton+35%Polyester
Size: Circumference: 22.8", Height:5", Brim: 4.5"

Package Includes:
1 x Visor Hat

Women's UPF 50+ UV Sun Protective Convertible Beach Visor Hat

A hat with at least a 2- to 3-inch brim all around is ideal because it protects areas that are often exposed to intense sun, such as the ears, eyes, forehead, nose, and scalp. A dark, non-reflective underside to the brim can also help lower the amount of UV rays reaching the face from reflective surfaces such as water.

Protect Yourself from Ultraviolet (UV) Rays

Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays. Most of this exposure comes from the sun, but some can come from man-made sources, such as indoor tanning beds and sun lamps. People who get a lot of exposure to UV rays are at greater risk for skin cancer.

The main types of UV rays that can affect your skin include UVA rays and UVB rays. UVB rays have more energy and are a more potent cause of at least some skin cancers, but both UVA and UVB rays can damage skin and cause skin cancer. There are no safe UV rays. (To learn more about the different types of UV rays, see Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation.)

How Can You Avoid Harmful Effects of the Sun?

Some people think about sun protection only when they spend a day at the lake, beach, or pool. But sun exposure adds up day after day, and it happens every time you are in the sun. Even though sunlight is the main source of UV rays, you don’t have to avoid the sun completely. And it would be unwise to stay inside if it would keep you from being active, because physical activity is important for good health. But getting too much sun can be harmful. There are some simple steps you can take to limit your exposure to UV rays.

Simply staying in the shade is one of the best ways to limit your UV exposure. If you are going to be in the sun, "Slip! Slop! Slap!® and Wrap" is a catchphrase that can help you remember some of the key steps you can take to protect yourself from UV rays:

  • Slip on a shirt. 
  • Slop on sunscreen. 
  • Slap on a hat. 
  • Wrap on sunglasses to protect the eyes and skin around them. 

Unique 2-in-1 design 

Features a zipper that removes the top part of the hat away from the visor section, so you can wear it either as a hat to cover your head or simply as a wide-brimmed visor

Adjustable Velcro 

A cute bow covered the Velcro part,sun visor hat can be adjusted with its' velcro back closure

Foldable & Packable 

This ladies visor sun hat is foldable & packable while still maintaining its shape, its compactable size makes it easy to store anywhere & carried in your bag on-the-go for travels

Our 2 in 1 sun hat is perfect for various outdoor activities such as
golf, camping, picnicking at the park, running and more 

Removable sun hat :
Convert between sun hat and sun visor by zipper
Wide brim:
4.5" wide brim protect your eyes and face from sun and ultraviolet rays
Material:
Superior polyester fabric, lightweight and breathable quality
Perfect for outdoor:
Hiking hat gardening hat and biking hat

2 in 1 Wide Brim Sun Visor Hats for Women

Unique 2-in-1 Design - Features a zipper that removes the top part of the hat away from the visor section, so you can wear it either as a hat to cover your head or simply as a wide-brimmed visor 
Storage & Travel-Friendly - This ladies visor sun hat is foldable & packable while still maintaining its shape, its compactable size makes it easy to store anywhere & carried in your bag on-the-go for travels 

What affects UV exposure?  

The strength of the sun's UV rays reaching the ground depends on a number of factors, such as:

  • Time of day: UV rays are strongest in the middle of the day, between 10 am and 4 pm.  
  • Season of the year: UV rays are stronger during spring and summer months. This is less of a factor near the equator.  
  • Distance from the equator (latitude): UV exposure goes down as you get further from the equator.  
  • Altitude: More UV rays reach the ground at higher elevations.  
  • Cloud cover: The effect of clouds can vary, but it's important to know that UV rays can get through to the ground, even on a cloudy day.  
  • Reflection off surfaces: UV rays can bounce off surfaces like water, sand, snow, or pavement, leading to an increase in UV exposure.

What is the UV Index?  

The US National Weather Service and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have developed the UV Index, which gives you an idea of how strong the UV light is in your area on any given day, on a scale from 1 to 11+. A higher number means greater risk of exposure to UV rays and a higher chance of sunburn and skin damage that could ultimately lead to skin cancer. The UV Index is part of many weather forecasts throughout the country. Further information about the UV Index, as well as your local UV Index forecast, can be found on the EPA's website at www.epa.gov/sunsafety/uv-index-1

Other factors affecting UV exposure  

Along with the strength of the rays, the amount of UV exposure you get also depends on the length of time your skin is exposed, and if your skin is protected with clothing or sunscreen.

People who live in areas with year-round, bright sunlight have a higher risk of skin cancer. Spending a lot of time outdoors for work or recreation without protective clothing and sunscreen increases your risk.

The pattern of exposure may also affect your skin cancer risk. For example, frequent sunburns in childhood may increase the risk for some types of skin cancer many years or even decades later.

It's also important to understand that some people are more likely to get skin damage from the sun, for a variety of reasons.